TOP
logo
Zimbabwe
  • icon
    Search for Air Ticket
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Hotels
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Tour Packages
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Sightseeing
    Search
    icon
  • icon
    Search for Travel Activity
    Search
    icon
icon Worldwideicon
Contact

Destination Details

Windhoek, Namibia

When is the best time to visit to Namibia?

Unlike many other African countries, Namibia is an all year destination. The dry season is best for game viewing whereas the wetter (green) season is better for scenery, bird watching and general photography.

January, February, March & April:

Wildlife and game viewing: Animals, especially in Etosha, tend to spread out and not gather at the waterholes. However, this does not mean that one does not see animals. Many of the plains game like springbok and zebra, give birth during this time so lots of young to be seen. Animals like the lions, leopard and others stay in their territories and do not move away.

Desert and landscapes: This period is the best time to visit the Namib Desert with its green grasses, open and clear skies with some beautiful cloud formations.

Photography: This is an excellent time in the desert for landscapes, beautiful colours as well as ethnic people.

May, June, July & August:

Wildlife and game viewing: Water levels are dropping and animals start congregating at waterholes for their daily drink. Still quite a lot of vegetation so animals are a quite spread out. A good time for game viewing.

Desert and landscapes: Autumn and winter means cool and chilly evenings bringing crisp conditions, clear skies and pristine dunes and landscapes.

Photography: Fantastic months for photography. Landscapes, dune formations etc are at their best with little dust in the air giving clear and open skies.

September, October, November & December:

Wildlife and game viewing: This period can get very hot indeed which makes for excellent game viewing … again, a wide range of animals meeting at the waterholes. This is often during the heat of the day so good game viewing throughout the day. In the north of Namibia, the rains can start as early as December but game viewing is normally still excellent.

Desert and landscapes: All year destination but can get extremely hot from about 11h00 to 16h00.

Photography: Photography in Namibia is always good … game in Etosha, dunes at Sossusvlei, landscapes and ethnic people. Middle of the day and early afternoon is hot and the light would not be that good.

Damaraland

Damaraland features vast khaki plains, sheer rocky mountains and incredible desert-adapted wildlife. Track rhino and desert elephant, explore the rugged land or sit back and enjoy the dramatic scenery.

Damaraland is where you will find Namibia's wildlife; that typical African safari with teeming plains herds, fearful predators, noble giants and an underworld of fascinating plants, insects, birds, reptiles and mammals.

Southern Damaraland, from Swakopmund up to the Huab River, has many geological and historical attractions and is a popular region for rugged off-road camping expeditions. The land rises slowly up towards the great escarpment and volcano-induced peaks break up the endless plains.

Northern Damaraland up to the Hoanib River has the greatest concentration of game. The terrain rumples into grassy hills dotted with mopane and acacia trees as you travel north-east over the plateau towards Etosha National Park.

The area is divided into several enormous private game reserves, known as concessions, that support most species of Namibia's large game and provide some of the best birding and wildlife experiences in the country - and southern Africa for that matter.

Southern Damaraland

Giant inselbergs, formed millions ago when lava was all the rage, rise sheer and jagged from the barren plains of the inner Namib Desert. Most impressive of these areSpitzkoppe and the Brandberg Massif - which, in addition to being the highest peak in the country, has the allure of ancient rock paintings and the intriguing White Lady of Brandberg.

Two very large volcanic craters, also millions of years old, hold evidence of Namibia's earliest inhabitants and, at 22km across, Messum Crater is an astonishing sight. It has lost most of its outer ring but has the most fascinating rock formations and ancient plants such as the welwitschia, a variety of lichens, lithops and other desert-adapted flora.

Near Khorixas there is a nucleus of fascinating geological formations: Vingerklip is a striking finger of rock that rises vertically out of the plains while around it the lava-formed flat-tops wouldn't look out of place in Arizona.

The Organ Pipes are a series of dolerite pipes that, oddly enough, resemble organs pipes - though these ones were created 100 million years ago and are probably a bit out of tune by now.

Over 200 million years ago, a great flood swept enormous trees into the desert. These trees were fossilised by the sand and formed what is now a Petrified Forest.

If for no other reason than its great name, you should visit Wondergat: Gat means hole in Afrikaans.

As a result of some lava-induced chemical reaction over 100 million years ago, Burnt Mountain undergoes a spectacular transformation from dull grey to a hundred fiery reds every sunrise and sunset.

Among the red sandstone boulders and hills at Twyfelfontein is the most impressive collection of petroglyphs in Africa. Around 2,500 ancient rock paintings and engravings feature animals, tracks and abstract symbols. The exact age is unknown but archaeological evidence indicates that hunter/gatherers lived here more than 7,000 years ago.

Northern Damaraland                                                                                                

Northern Damaraland rises to the Etendeka Plateau and the ground becomes more vegetated as you move north-east towards Etosha National Park . The main attractions are the private concessions that adjoin the great park and here is where you will find that classic African safari - with a Namibian edge.

The famous desert-adapted elephants traverse this vast dry land in search of water and the world's only naturally occurring population of black rhino co-exists with the Damara communities. The endemic black-faced impala, Damara dik-dik and Hartmann's mountain zebra thrive in the region as do several endemic species of bird including Rüppell's korhaan, Herero chat, Monteiro's hornbill, bare-cheeked babbler, Carp's tit and Hartlaub's francolin.

Endemics aside northern Damaraland's hilly savannah supports a large number of species including lion, leopard, cheetah, hyena, eland, kudu, giraffe, klipspringer, steenbok, gemsbok and springbok. Birdlife is prolific with over 33 raptors recorded including cuckoo hawks, Egyptian vultures and peregrine falcons - the world's fastest animal.he list of wildlife, birds, plants and smaller fascinations is almost endless and the best way to experience this bountiful region is at the hands of an experienced professional guide

Check out more destinations